G/I/S: Terrain, Speculation, Swarms

Posted by InfraNet Lab on February 26, 2010 | PERMALINK

 

Nix Ex Machina. Having humbly set himself apart as one of life''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''s great thinkers, Tarko rejects the menial tasks offered to him by the job agency and quickly reaches the conclusion that selling snow to the Eskimos is well within his capabilities.  Not put off by a few holes in his business plan – a complete lack of funds, no guaranteed supply of snow and not one hint of commercial interest from his intended market – he establishes snowbrokers.com, an online brokerage service to facilitate snow sales to the Inuit tribes of Alaska.]
[Nix Ex Machina. Having humbly set himself apart as one of lifes great thinkers, Tarko rejects the menial tasks offered to him by the job agency and quickly reaches the conclusion that selling snow to the Eskimos is well within his capabilities. Not put off by a few holes in his business plan–a complete lack of funds, no guaranteed supply of snow and not one hint of commercial interest from his intended market–he establishes snowbrokers.com, an online brokerage service to facilitate snow sales to the Inuit tribes of Alaska.]

It was a pleasure to participate in the amazing cross-blog dialogue–or blogoquim, as we liked to call it–this week as part of the Glacier/Island/Storm studio. No doubt the conversation will continue to expand from here. We are now looking forward to seeing / reading the projects incubated in this context.

In the meantime we leave you with InfraNet Labs 3 contributions, and a postscript.

1. LandFab, or Manufacturing Terrain. Island Edition.

2. Islands of Speculation, Speculation on Islands: Spray Ice. Glacier Edition.

3. Particulate Swarms. Storm Edition.

Postscript: please visit Snowbrokers: eCommerce for eSkimos. Especially recommended is their Short History of Snow Logistics.

Snowbrokers.com was set up a few years ago to service the growing need of online snow sales for the Inuit community of Alaska. Although research had clearly indicated that there was in fact no need at all for such a service this meant that if even the remotest need was ever discovered then this was clear growth from a starting point of zero. And as no serious canvassing of Eskimo snow purchasing tastes had ever been carried out then the assumption that there was no need could be considered flakey.